How Physical Therapy Helps Retirees Keep Dreams Alive During the Golden Years


Are you among the millions of Americans who have high aspirations for how you’ll spend the extra time during your post-retirement years? Whether you plan to travel the world, pick up fly fishing, spend more time woodworking or sign up for a golf league, your physical fitness level will be a factor.

A 2010 study suggests that the fitness declines we typically attribute to advancing age are largely caused by living sedentary lifestyles—which are on the rise due to the prominence of desk jobs in the workplace and activity-limiting personal technologies including smart phones and voice-activated remote controls in the home. Still, this runs contrary to the widely held belief that any declines in our physical abilities are caused solely by biological aging. Do we really have control over how active we’ll be in our “golden years”?

In a word, absolutely. The study—which examined 900,000 running times of marathon and half-marathon participants aged 20 to 79—found no significant age-related performance declines in those younger than 55 years old, and only moderate declines among the older cohorts. In fact, more than one-quarter of runners aged 65 to 69 were faster than half of the runners aged 20 to 54.

And for those thinking that these runners must have been lifelong enthusiasts of the sport, the study revealed that 25% of runners aged 50 to 69 were relative newcomers—and had started marathon training within the previous 5 years. The researchers concluded that even at an advanced age, people in the “non-athlete” category who engage in regular training can reach high performance levels.

If this revelation is intriguing, then perhaps it’s time for you to get moving! If you aren’t currently active, then you likely have questions and concerns about where to start. And if you regularly engage in physical activities, then you’ve probably set goals that you’d like to achieve. Either way, there’s no shortage of tools and resources to help you live a more active lifestyle but one reliable place to start is with a physical therapist.

The benefits of beginning with a physical therapist consultation are many: PTs are trained to assess your abilities and limitations, consider your health concerns, demonstrate safe exercises and build a plan to increase strength, function and mobility. Whatever your passion is, physical therapy will help you be fit and injury-free so you may enjoy life’s many pursuits.

"Kristi’s weekly bootcamp has truly gotten me out of my comfort zone. I started attending with my family a few months ago. My first couple of times I was so ore! At times I became discouraged, but I just pushed through! I keep coming every week I am available. There’s no shaming if you must miss a week. You can even have someone go on your behalf if you miss a week. Since starting Kristi’s bootcamp I’ve said yes to other fitness opportunities I would have previously turned down. I now workout EVERYDAY and I’ve lost over 20 lbs since I first started coming. Thanks Kristi and to my family for introducing mw to this awesome bootcamp!"

− Amanda

"Dear Alika- I want to tell you how great A2 has been in helping me to succeed in getting better after my stroke. Your staff is not only knowledgeable but funny at the same time. They don’t make physical therapy seem tough; but they make it fun by teaching us the right way to stand, asking us how we are and encouraging us to reach our goals. My goal has always been to get back to “normal.” I appreciate all of your staff immensely. They are all great. You always have my recommendation for where to go for P.T."

− Crestina

"I came to A2 PT to assist in my recovery of a torn Achilles tendon. Not fully knowing what to expect, I was pleasantly surprised. Using a combination of PT (for strengthening and stretching) and massage (for scare tissue Break up) I feel my recovery has been accelerated. The whole crew Alika, Kristi, and Sophia are very kind, spirited, and passionate about their jobs! On a personal note, the word massage should be removed from the phrase deep tissue massage. It is very misleading-but it does work!
Keep up the great work gang!!"

− Christopher